Schedule

08:30

REGISTRATION & LIGHT BREAKFAST

08:50

WELCOME

09:10

Andrew Hudson-Smith

Andrew Hudson-Smith, University College London

IoT, Big Data, Sensors & Cities: Joining Up, Communicating & Trusting 'Smart'

IoT, Big Data, Sensors & Cities: Joining Up, Communicating & Trusting 'Smart'

Data is everywhere yet it is far from joined up, coherent or used to make anything truly 'Smart'. The talk explores big data in London, how new visualisations can be used to make sense of data in the city. It examines how 'location' can be used to finally join everything together to help us not only understand the city around us but also our understanding of place and place in a world of sensors and IoT. Finally it looks into the opportunity that is the 'Smart Park' - the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, a park with plans for 10,000's of sensors to provide a glimpse of the future.

Dr Andrew Hudson-Smith is Director of the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis (CASA) at The Bartlett, University College London. Andy is a Reader in Digital Urban Systems and Editor-in-Chief of Future Internet Journal, he is also an elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, a member of the Greater London Authority Smart London Board and Course Founder of the MRes in Advanced Spatial Analysis and Visualisation and MSc in Smart Cities at University College London.

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09:30

Eric Yeatman

Eric Yeatman, Imperial College London

Growing the Intelligence of Future City Infrastructure

Growing the Intelligence of Future City Infrastructure

Cities are getting steadily more “intelligent” through increasing use of sensors, wireless communication, computation-enabled devices, and citizen interaction through smart phone apps. Transport is a prime example where the benefits – in convenience and efficiency – are evident. Existing technology offers the capability to extend these benefits much further, particularly in linking the intelligence from different sectors, but there are major challenges to overcome and questions to resolve. This talk will examine some of these, such as how to power and maintain huge networks of sensors; how to connect deployers and beneficiaries of smart technology to achieve return on investment; and how to control interlinked systems across very different sectors.

Eric M. Yeatman has been a member of academic staff in Imperial College London since 1989, and Professor of Micro-Engineering since 2005. He is Deputy Head of the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, and has published more than 200 papers and patents, primarily on optical devices and materials, and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). He is also Co-Director of the college's Digital Economy Lab, and Principal Investigator of the multi-faculty project Digital City Exchange. He is a Fellow and Silver Medalist of the Royal Academy of Engineering, and a Fellow of the IEEE. Prof. Yeatman is also co-founder and director of Microsaic Systems plc, which develops and markets miniature mass spectrometers for portable chemical analysis. His current research interests are in energy sources for wireless devices (particularly energy harvesting), radio frequency and photonic MEMS devices, pervasive sensing and sensor networks.

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09:50

Brian Waterfield

Brian Waterfield , Jaguar Land Rover

Experiencing the Product

Experiencing the Product

Virtual reality and augmented reality are becoming more and more mainstream; especially in the gaming and entertainment markets. The thirst of their customer’s pushing the development of the “experience” to the maximum. Vehicle design and engineering is changing. Our designers want to get deeper into their creations, and our engineers want to understand how our customers think; all this long before we reach the physical world. Virtual reality and augmented reality are being developed at JLR to deliver the experience of our customers throughout the product development process

I have worked at Jaguar Land Rover for the last 14 years, and have evolved virtual reality and high-end visualisation over the pass 8. Technologies has always fascinated me and lead me back to university to achieve a master degree with distinction in Virtual reality, high-end visualisation gaming technology; which enabled me to apply this knowledge to the development of our vehicles.

I set up the VRcentre in 2008 which at the time lead the automotive world in resolution and functionally, it comprised of three walls and a ceiling offering 4x HD and multifunctional graphics. I have developed technics to enable visual perception of our brands DNA, along with ergonomic process that have aided the development of challenging design like the Evoque & F-type Over the past six year I have matured the virtual support and last year finish an extension to the VRcentre, renaming it the “virtual innovation centre” introducing state of the art technology and resources to further enhance virtual innovation. I am a strong believer in this technology changing the engineering and design landscape, so I continue to work with universities to achieve my goal to create the perceptual equivalent of the real world

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10:10

COFFEE

10:30

Chris Green

Chris Green, Design Museum

Designing UFOs : An Ecosystem of Urban Flying Objects

Flying Food : Unlocking the agricultural potential of urban airspace

As drones continue to move towards mass industrial adoption, how can this emerging technology allow us to rethink our agricultural production processes? Considering drones as a new form of aerial urban infrastructure, these autonomous vehicles enable us to tap into the productive potential of our urban airspace, and reimagine the city as three-dimensional agricultural garden.

Chris Green is a Designer in Residence at the Design Museum, who’s work forges new relationships between people, technology and the city. An architectural designer engaged with emerging technologies, Chris's work explores the future of our digitally-connected environments through the design of interfaces, objects and infrastructures. With a background in Architecture from the Royal College of Art, Chris was a Research Fellow at MIT Senseable City Lab, developing urban applications for autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).

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10:50

Roderich Gross

Roderich Gross, University of Sheffield

Swarm Robotics – the Future of Healthcare?

Swarm Robotics – the Future of Healthcare?

We overview our recent advances in controlling swarms of centimeter-scale robots. It is shown that collaborative tasks can be provably solved by groups of robots with exceedingly limited resources. In some instances, this requires neither memory nor computation, allowing such systems to be implemented at the micron-scale. We will present how robots can reconfigure into different shapes and harvest energy from their environment. Moreover, we present a method for inferring behavioral rules from observed trajectories of individuals in a swarm. We conclude the talk by discussing the prospects and implications of swarms being integrated into healthcare technologies.

Roderich Gross received a Diploma degree in computer science in 2001 from Dortmund University of Technology and a Ph.D. degree in engineering sciences in 2007 from the Universite Libre de Bruxelles. From 2005-2009, he was a JSPS research fellow at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, a research associate at the University of Bristol, a Marie Curie Research Fellow at Unilever R&D (UK), and a Marie Curie Intra-European Fellow at EPFL. From 2010-2013, he was a Lecturer and since January 2014, he has been a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering of the University of Sheffield.

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11:10

Juan Moreno

Juan Moreno, Neural Rehabilitation Group, Cajal Institute

Bioinspired Management of Interactions During Walking Assisted by Compliant Wearable Exoskeletons

Bioinspired Management of Interactions During Walking Assisted by Compliant Wearable Exoskeletons

To be successful, autonomous active exoskeletons require a robust human-machine interface for the control, able to understand patient’s intention and contribution to the movement. The concept of symbiotic interaction is proposed to improve the management of interactions that take place when humans are assisted to walk with ambulant exoskeletons. The talk will discuss the latest progresses and clinical findings of most advanced gait exoskeletons for treatment of neurological diseases that affect human mobility. The particular approach adopted in the BioMot exoskeleton to exploit dynamic sensory-motor interactions to improve the interaction of human users will be presented. The research and results of application of such cognitive architecture exploiting neuronal control and learning mechanisms will be presented and discussed.

Dr. Juan Moreno is with CSIC since 2001. He received the degree in automatics engineering from U. La Salle and since 2001 he has been with CSIC, developing and studying the lower leg orthosis GAIT at the Bioengineering Group, and received the Ph.D. in Engineering in 2006. He has scientifically and technically coordinated a number of projects in the field of assistive technologies and robotics (5FP EU project GAIT, FP6 EU project ESBIRRO, FP7 EU project BETTER). In 2012 Dr. Moreno has been awarded for his research track as young investigator with the TR35 Spain award by Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s (MIT) journal, Technology Review for his innovative work on Wearable Exoskeletons for rehabilitation. Currently Dr. Moreno is the technical & scientific head of the locomotion cluster in the Bioengineering Group, leading developments of lower limb devices for rehabilitation. He is the Principal Investigator of the BioMot EU Project of the FET-Proactive Initiative on Symbiotic human-machine interaction.

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11:30

LUNCH

11:50

Francesca Rosella

Francesca Rosella, CuteCircuit

The Internet of Fashionable Things

The Internet of Fashionable Things

CuteCircuit is a fashion brand and a pioneer in the field of wearable technology. Founded over a decade ago, CuteCircuit sparked the fashion and technology revolution through the introduction of groundbreaking designs and concepts that merge the worlds of fashion, design and telecommunication. CuteCircuit introduced internet connected clothing and touch (haptic) telecommunication with products such as the Hug Shirt in 2002 (awarded by Time magazine as one of the Best Inventions of the Year in 2006). The Galaxy Dress introduced in 2008 (part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago) remains today the world’s largest wearable luminous display, a magical garment. Social media connected clothing such as the world’s first haute couture Twitter Dress was introduced in 2012. CuteCircuit became the first fashion label to put wearable technology on the red carpet when Katy Perry wore their gown to the Met Gala in 2010, and the same year CuteCircuit introduced the first line of technologically advanced ready-to-wear at Selfridges in London. The latest collection presented on schedule at New York Fashion week introduces haute couture and ready-to-wear fashions that can be controlled via smartphone app to allow the wearer to change the colour and functionality of their garments at the touch of a button.

All CuteCircuit garments are designed by Francesca Rosella and Ryan Genz. Francesca’s early career began as designer for Valentino in Italy. CuteCircuit’s Designers share their passion for fashion worldwide by participating in conferences and events where they speak on subjects of innovation, the future of fashion and design. Always endeavouring to create something resonant, fashionable, visually and emotionally attractive; their work is frequently featured in numerous books and publications on design, fashion and innovation

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12:10

Moritz Dörstelmann

Moritz Dörstelmann, Stuttgart University

Cyber-Physical Fabrication Strategies for Fiber Composites

Cyber-Physical Fabrication Strategies for Fiber Composites

Biological lightweight structures achieve a higher level in material efficiency and functional integration as it is the case in today’s architectural constructions. Their performance is based on very integrated form generation and materialization processes for highly articulated and locally adapted fiber composite structures.

The exploration of novel computational design and robotic fabrication methods for technical fiber composites opens up the potential to transfer underlying principles of biological lightweight structures into architectural applications. These investigations allow us to increase the performative capacity of architectural structures and explore a novel design repertoire.

Moritz Dörstelmann is a Research Associate and Doctoral Candidate at the Institute for Computational Design at Stuttgart University. He studied architecture at the RWTH Aachen University and the University of Applied Arts in Vienna. Focus of Moritz’s research are computational design and robotic fabrication strategies for fiber composite structures and how their application in architecture can expand the architectural design repertoire and increase its performative capacity.

Moritz Dörstelmann worked on several internationally published and exhibited projects. He has been invited studio critic and gave lectures and workshops at various international institutions including the Harvard GSD.

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12:30

Elaine Warburton

Elaine Warburton, QuantuMDx

Internet of Life – Transforming Healthcare

Internet of Life – Transforming Healthcare

Just as the internet has revolutionised how we share information, the Internet of Life will transform our healthcare systems globally. In response to the growing threat of emerging infections and drug resistant ‘superbugs’, QuantuMDx is digitizing biology to share pathogen data on a never-before-seen scale. This technology leap will enable healthcare workers to prevent pandemics via rapid identification of novel infections in the field, and will create a cloud-based monitoring system to map the global spread of disease and drug resistance.

Elaine is an entrepreneur with over 25 years’ healthcare and biotechnology experience. With an eclectic background in nursing, genetics, accounting and running hospitals, she currently heads up QuantuMDx Group, one of the most exciting biotechs to emerge onto the ‘precision medicine’ global stage, developing a low cost handheld molecular lab with inbuilt DNA sequencing to help address humanitarian health challenges in both developed and developing nations. The first assays to be commercialised later in 2015 are in infectious disease and drug resistance testing. Elaine was awarded an OBE in the 2014 Queen’s New Year Honours for services to Innovation in Healthcare.

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12:50

Mario Ettore Giardini

Mario Ettore Giardini, University of Strathclyde

Peek, the Portable Eye Examination Kit

Peek, the Portable Eye Examination Kit

Mario will present Peek, the Portable Eye Examination Kit, for which he leads the hardware design. There are 39 million blind people in the world, and 80% of these cases are avoidable. Peek is a toolkit that harnesses the capabilities of smartphones for testing eyes in any situation, from surgeries to patients’ homes. It consists of a smartphone app and a low-cost clip-on adapter, which allow to perform eye examinations in even the remotest of settings. It is easy to use, affordable and portable, empowering health workers to screen for eye diseases, and to simplify managing and monitoring treatment of patients, anywhere in the world.

Mario Ettore Giardini has a background in electronic engineering, and has been working for the last 20 years on biomedical instrumentation and technology, as Research Scientist at the Italian National Institute for Physics of Matter, as Director of R&D for a leading European microscope manufacturer, and currently as Lecturer in Digital Health at the University of Strathclyde, in Scotland, where he develops technologies, devices and instruments for global healthcare, for field and point-of-care medicine and for medical robotics. Devices deriving from his research are sold worldwide.

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13:10

COFFEE

13:30

Stewart Nickolas

Stewart Nickolas, IBM

The Information Experience

The Information Experience

We are awash in a continuous information experience which is evolving to be immersive, experiential and multi-modal. We are probing, prodding, feeding and transforming information; the journey is continuous in most aspects of our life. How we can gain new insights and efficiencies using new and evolving interaction patterns? We’ll explore how application experiences are becoming contextual across a variety of devices, enabling data to come to us in context when needed. As the environment around us becomes smarter, how do our interaction patterns change? We see conversational computing changing the way we interact, from our environment understanding our behavior to us directly prescribing behaviors through conversations, beyond simple command-and-control.

Stew Nickolas is an IBM Distinguished Engineer working in the IBM Emerging Internet Technologies organization where he has led several projects focused on new and evolving technologies that represent future business opportunities. As a Distinguished Engineer, Stew is involved at all levels of development, from strategy & investment to product planning and development. Most recently Stew has led efforts driving IBM adoption of Platform as a Service (IBM Bluemix), Big Data analytics, IBM Watson productization and collaborative development environments.

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13:50

Simon Schultz

Simon Schultz, Imperial College London

Optical Neurotechnology: Watching Brain Circuits in Action

Optical Neurotechnology: Watching Brain Circuits in Action

A combination of technological developments over the last few years have instigated a revolution in the brain sciences. The development of two photon fluorescence microscopy allowed us to observe single neurons, and even subcellular processes such as dendrites, in the intact and functioning brain. Genetically encodable reporters have been developed which allow calcium and voltage signals to be visualised while the brain processes information, and even to manipulate cell function with light. In this talk I will describe how engineers and neuroscientists are working together to “reverse engineer” brain circuits, and discuss how these technologies may lead to advances in treatments for brain degeneration in dementia and natural aging.

Simon Schultz is Royal Society Industry Fellow and Reader in Neurotechnology at Imperial College London. He trained in physics and electrical engineering in Australia, before completing a D.Phil. in neuroscience at Oxford University, and postdoctoral fellowships at NYU and UCL. He joined Imperial in 2004, and since has led the development of a critical mass of research at the interface between engineering and neuroscience. He is widely known for theoretical and experimental work on neural coding - the study of how the brain represents information – as well as the use of multiphoton optical methods to study brain circuits. He is Director of the new £10M EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Neurotechnology.

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Future Connected Cities & The Smart Home

Smart Robots & Applications

Smart Textiles & Materials

15:10

CONVERSATION & DRINKS

15:30

Chris Brauer

Chris Brauer, Goldsmiths, University of London

The 'Quiet Eyes' of the Auto-Pilot: Co-creating a Vision for Living 'Smart Lives'

Humana ex Machina: Delivering positive human experiences in chatbots

Dr Chris Brauer, Director of Innovation at Goldsmiths, University of London presents research findings from mixed methods project including subject-matter-expert interviews, quantitative survey, auto-ethnography, experience sampling, co-creation and customer experience trials.

Dr Chris Brauer is a Senior Lecturer and Director of the MSc Management of Innovation programme and the Centre for Creative and Social Technologies (CAST) in the Institute of Management Studies (IMS) at Goldsmiths, University of London. Chris was formerly a journalist and a programmer and his research interests are in the intersections of emerging technologies and social life, psychology, economics, and culture.

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Julian Blake

Julian Blake, Tech City Insider

Moderator for Extended Q&A

Julian Blake is a journalist and editor with 20 years’ experience covering business, social and political issues. He's the editor of Techcityinsider.net, providing content about technology business in London. He’s also written about housing, property, architecture, local government, charities and travel. He previously worked for homelessness charity Shelter and is a founder of environmental charity Trees for Cities, where he has organised 50+ fundraising club and cabaret events. In 2011, he spent a year travelling across Latin America and the US, blogging and taking photos.

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16:10

Gemma Milne

Gemma Milne, Ogilvy Labs

Swarm Robotics - Extended Q&A

Gemma is a Scottish creative science-nerd obsessed with technology, design, startups, Irn Bru and pi. She is the Creative Lab Technologist at Ogilvy Labs, bringing the incredible world of future technology and innovation into the agency by looking out, forging partnerships and ensuring a culture of forward-facing marketing. She is an active member of the Women In Tech community and is currently on a mission to improve science communication through advertising.

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Innovation in Healthcare & Advanced Neuroscience

Ryan Genz

Ryan Genz, CuteCircuit

The Internet of Fashionable Things

The Internet of Fashionable Things

CuteCircuit is a fashion brand and a pioneer in the field of wearable technology. Founded over a decade ago, CuteCircuit sparked the fashion and technology revolution through the introduction of groundbreaking designs and concepts that merge the worlds of fashion, design and telecommunication. CuteCircuit introduced internet connected clothing and touch (haptic) telecommunication with products such as the Hug Shirt in 2002 (awarded by Time magazine as one of the Best Inventions of the Year in 2006). The Galaxy Dress introduced in 2008 (part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago) remains today the world’s largest wearable luminous display, a magical garment. Social media connected clothing such as the world’s first haute couture Twitter Dress was introduced in 2012. CuteCircuit became the first fashion label to put wearable technology on the red carpet when Katy Perry wore their gown to the Met Gala in 2010, and the same year CuteCircuit introduced the first line of technologically advanced ready-to-wear at Selfridges in London. The latest collection presented on schedule at New York Fashion week introduces haute couture and ready-to-wear fashions that can be controlled via smartphone app to allow the wearer to change the colour and functionality of their garments at the touch of a button.

All CuteCircuit garments are designed by Francesca Rosella and Ryan Genz. Ryan is formally trained as anartist, anthropologist and ultimately Interaction Designer focusing on Wearable Technology andholds patents and patents pending for wearable technologies. CuteCircuit’s Designers share their passion for fashion worldwide by participating in conferences and events where they speak on subjects of innovation, the future of fashion and design. Always endeavouring to create something resonant, fashionable, visually and emotionally attractive; their work is frequently featured in numerous books and publications on design, fashion and innovation

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David McClelland

David McClelland, Freelance

Compère

David is a freelance journalist and broadcaster across consumer and enterprise technology, cybersecurity and mobile. He has written for The Metro, International Business Times,TechRadar, CNET, Wired and Computer Weekly.

He is ITV Good Morning Britain’s regular technology expert, a cybercrime-buster for BBC Watchdog, consumer champion on BBC Rip Off Britain and co-host of Challenge TV mobile technology show Planet of the Apps.

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17:30

Sabine Hauert

Sabine Hauert, University of Bristol

From Swarms of Flying Robots to Nanomedicine

From Swarms of Flying Robots to Nanomedicine

Nanoparticles for cancer applications are increasingly able to move, sense, and interact the body in a controlled fashion. The challenge is to discover how trillions of nanoparticles can work together to improve the detection and treatment of tumors. Towards this end, the field of swarm robotics offers tools and techniques for controlling large numbers of agents with limited capabilities. Our swarm strategies are designed in realistic simulators using bio-inspiration, machine learning and crowdsourcing (NanoDoc: http://nanodoc.org). Strategies are then translated to large swarms of robots or preliminary tissue-on-a-chip devices.

Sabine Hauert is Lecturer at the University of Bristol where she designs swarm of nanobots for biomedical applications. Swarm strategies are either inspired from nature or are automatically designed in simulation using machine learning and crowdsourcing. (NanoDoc - http://nanodoc.org). Before joining the University of Bristol, Sabine was a Human Frontier Science Program Cross-Disciplinary Fellow at the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT where she designed cooperative nanoparticles for cancer treatment. Her passion for swarm engineering started in 2006 as a PhD student at EPFL- Switzerland making swarms of flying robots for rescue operations. Passionate about science communication, Sabine is the Co-founder and President of the Robots Association, Co-founder of the ROBOTS Podcast (http://robotspodcast.com) and Robohub (http://robohub.org), as well as Media Editor for the journal Autonomous Robots.

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08:30

END OF SUMMIT

08:50

Paul Croft

Paul Croft, Ultimaker

How 3D Printing is Changing Lives

How 3D Printing is Enhancing Education & Providing Steam Opportunities: The Create Education Project

A lot has been written in recent years about 3D printing and its game changing potential and this is starting to have an impact in classrooms across the country. In 2014 we started the CREATE Education Project to try and help people take advantage of the opportunities that 3D printing offered and 2 years in it seems wise to see how things are progressing. We will look at some of the challenges being faced and champion some of the amazing work educators are doing to engage students. With 3D printing a key enabler in wearables, robotics, IOT and becoming a key part of design, engineering and manufacturing vocations are we setting up the next generation to succeed?

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09:10

Alessandro Crimi

Alessandro Crimi, Medrone

Rural Community Projects in Ghana using Mobile Phones & Drones

Rural Community Projects in Ghana using Mobile Phones & Drones

Rural areas of low-income countries present several challenges. We have already carried out successfully a project in rural areas in Ghana about prenatal care using mobile phones and remote ultrasound machines.

In the already existing network, we are now delivering rare medical supplies using drones, setting up a company called Medrone. We use drones endowed with artificial vision, allowing avoidance of obstacles which are not visible giving GPS coordinates.

Delivery of medicines to areas with inefficient infrastructure is our current focus but we are open minded to other opportunities. We believe this novel transportation mean can have a positive impact.

Alessandro was born in Italy, but he worked in several universities and research institutes in Europe and Africa. He holds a PhD in Medical Imaging and an MBA in international health. He is currently working as a researcher at the Italian Institute of Technology and as a lecturer at the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences. He believes that Innovation is useless unless it is brought into practice. In fact, he worked in a cooperation projects in Ghana about prenatal care (www.docmeup.org) and he is currently following a projects using drones and artificial vision for delivering medicines.

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09:30

Naveed Parvez

Naveed Parvez, Andiamo

Empathic Disruption

Empathic Disruption

Outline: Modern healthcare is the act of doing healthcare to people and not with them. Andiamo uses 3D scanning and printing to deliver disabled children's orthotics in a week rather than 6 months. What happens when you build a company where empathy is the core of everything they do?

Naveed has worked almost exclusively in startups both in the public and private sectors. His background in tech, operations, and project management combined with his experience as a parent of a severely disabled child led to Andiamo. A medical equipment service startup co-founded with his wife Samiya . Their aim is to reduce wait times for medical bracing for children with disabilities from 6 months down to 48 hours by using 3D scanning, 3D printing, and medical data.

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09:50

Pierre Paslier

Pierre Paslier, Gravity Sketch

Spatial Intelligence & 3D Sketching

Spatial intelligence and 3D sketching

Gravity Sketch is a tool to create 3D digital shapes in a quick and intuitive way. Our tool is a multi-platform software that can interface with a tablet, a computer or a virtual reality headset to help you understand and manipulate a 3D shape based on your spatial awareness.

Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences states that people, throughout their lives, become stronger in some of the nine intelligences. People in creative industries such as design and engineering have developed a stronger spatial intelligence, however the available tools are based on linguistics and logic and neglect the spatial awareness needed in order to design intuitively.

Taking into consideration the basic human behaviour of quickly communicating ideas in 2D and augmenting it with the possibility of moving them in space and connecting them with other 2D lines to create 3D drawings as simple as sketching on a piece of paper. What would take 3 hours of making and 1 year of learning in regular CAD software, takes 5 minutes and 20 minutes of learning in Gravity Sketch.

Pierre is a London-based Innovation Design Engineer. He is a Masters graduate of the RCA’s Innovation Design Engineering programme (MA & MSci) and INSA de Lyon (MEng). Before joining the RCA, Pierre worked as packaging engineer for L'Oréal. His experimental approach combined with a user-centered design has proven to drive highly disruptive ideas towards reality. This passion for innovation led him to co-found two startups, Skipping Rocks Lab and Gravity Sketch. He has given a number of conferences about his projects including a TEDx Talk in Athens. Pierre likes to take on challenges where both his technical and design skills will be necessary to deliver radical innovation.

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10:10

Rob Russell

Rob Russell, Senseye

Predictive Analytics in IoT: Lessons Learnt from Aerospace

Prognostics and the City

Rob will talk about machine prognostics and make the link to how the high levels of connectivity will lead to improved reliability and availability of city infrastructure. Explaining how previous experience implementing solutions in high-end sectors and seeing the benefits, formed the vision for Senseye and their product PROGNOSYS. Lowering the barriers to entry through the use of machine learning and embedding domain knowledge that makes a complex problem space finite and turning prognostic capability into a commodity.

Rob is the Chief Technology Officer at Senseye, with a BEng in Mechanical Systems Engineering. He has spent the last 20 years designing and deploying asset management and condition monitoring systems within the aerospace, defence and transport sectors. Having a mechanical engineering background in the software sector has enabled Rob to bridge the gap between the end user and the software teams he leads. Now in Senseye this experience in guiding the vision for the development of PROGNOSYS the first complete machine prognostic solution, fit for the Industrial Internet of Things. Rob is passionate about maximising asset and equipment usage but believes in keeping things simple.

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10:30

Charlotte Downs

Charlotte Downs, 3D Hubs

3D Hubs: 3D Printing Accessible to Everyone

3D Hubs: 3D Printing Accessible to Everyone

3D Hubs was founded out of frustration that the industry was not delivering on the promise of 3D printing to decentralize manufacturing. In 2013 3D Hubs started its mission to connect all 3D printers globally into one online platform and make them locally accessible. By connecting everyone to nearby 3D Printer owners, 3D Hubs is accelerating a future of local and on-demand production. Today, 3D Hubs is already providing over one Billion people with access to 3D printing within 10 miles of their home.

Charlotte Downs — acts as the London Mayor for 3D Hubs lending her skills and expertise with Cinter to develop and grow the quickly emerging London 3D printing community. Charlotte is Managing Director at Cinter, an upstart engineering and design consultancy. Her focus: sustainability, systems, and supply lines. Charlotte’s background is in the fashion industry, she has led marketing campaigns and managed business for a high-end fashion brand. She has also served as ambassador for the International Olympic Committee (IOC), and provided UX design and service/systems expertise for Onefinestay. Now as a Designer, Engineer, Tutor and Materials Scientist she wants to empower and engage learning across tech, additive manufacturing, disruptive technologies and future industry to benefit and promote positive economic and environmental change.

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10:50

COFFEE

11:10

Luca Gammaitoni

Luca Gammaitoni, University of Perugia

Toward Zero-Power Computing

Toward Zero-Power Computing

Present computers consume too much energy, producing a large amount of heat during computation. This condition is limiting the development of future, more powerful computers and constitutes a bottleneck for the growth of the Internet of Things (IoT) scenario. How can we dramatically lower the energy consumption of computing? What is the minimum energy required by a computing device? Can we build a computer that operates without spending any energy at all? These questions today have new answers and “zero-power computing” has left the pure speculations to enter physics laboratories. In the meantime we discovered that what we though to know about reversible computing is wrong…

Luca Gammaitoni, is Professor of Physics at the University of Perugia, in Italy and the director of the Noise in Physical Systems Laboratory. He is the founder of Wisepower srl a university spin-off company focused on micro-energy generators. He obtained the PhD in Physics from the University of Pisa in 1990. He has developed a wide international experience with collaborations both in Europe, Japan and the USA. His scientific interests span from noise phenomena in physical systems to non-equilibrium thermodynamics and energy transformations at micro and nanoscale. He authored over 200 papers on top-level scientific journals, few books and10 patents.

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11:30

Daniel Becerra

Daniel Becerra, Buffalo Grid

BuffaloGrid Power & Connectivity to the Off Grid World

BuffaloGrid - Power & Connectivity in Frontier Markets

Connectivity is the biggest factor contributing to economic growth in frontier markets. But access to power is limiting people’s ability to connect. We want to see a world that is connected. We want to provide power and connectivity to the 1.2 billion who need it most. So we are building a 21st Century utility company for the off-grid world.

Daniel Becerra has over ten years of experience working on design and technology projects. Daniel has a first degree in Industrial Design from Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City and an MA and MSc in Innovation Design Engineering awarded by the Royal College of Art and Imperial College, London. Daniel was one of the founders and the design director of Artica Technologies, a company which created a multi award winning low-energy cooling, ventilation and heat recovery system. Since the sale of Artica in late 2010, he has been working on the development of BuffaloGrid another award winning solution to bring electrical power as service to the off-grid world. BuffaloGrid is expanding to 2 continents during 2014. Daniel has previously run his own design consultancy and workshop in Mexico and has undertaken work for a number of prestigious clients including: Rolex, BMW and the Mexican Government.

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11:50

Lucy Donaldson

Lucy Donaldson, The University of Nottingham

New Targets for Pain Control

New Targets for Pain Control

Over the last few years, several new pain killers have been approved for use, are in early clinical trial, or are progressing well through development. Despite this we are still largely dependent on drugs based on willow bark (aspirin and derivatives) and poppies (morphine and other opiates). In our work in analgesic drug development, we have taken a completely new approach of targeting the process the body uses to generate many different proteins from a single gene – alternative RNA splicing. Using this approach, we aim to use endogenous systems in the body to treat neuropathic pain.

Lucy is a neurophysiologist with expertise in sensory neuronal function in disease states. Starting out as a dentist, Lucy studied for her undergraduate (Dentistry BDS, Neuroscience BSc (Hons) and postgraduate (PhD, Pharmacology) degrees at the University of Edinburgh. She has worked at the University of California Davis (’94-’96), the University of Leicester(’96-’98), the University of Bristol (’99-2013) and now as Associate Professor at the University of Nottingham. She has expertise in the areas of chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain, and in human taste perception in health and disease. She is co- founder and consultant to a spin-out drug development company Exonate.

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12:10

Parashkev Nachev

Parashkev Nachev, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery

Interfacing the Brain

Interfacing the Brain

Popular neuroscience reinforces a view of the brain as a machine: a very complex machine, but nonetheless an entity essentially mechanistic in character and purposeful in design. Attempts to interface technology with the brain -- either directly or via the senses -- generally labour under the same misconception. Here I explain why the brain is largely opaque to mechanistic interfacing in a way that is not limited by technological sophistication but by biological reality. Positively, I show how seeing the brain in the right light could let us make better use of personal technology.

Parashkev Nachev is a Senior Clinical Research Associate at the Institute of Neurology and an Honorary Consultant Neurologist at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square. His research deals primarily with translational aspects of cognitive and behavioural neurology, in particular with the development of novel methodology for distributed investigational and therapeutic devices.

12:30

REGISTRATION & LIGHT BREAKFAST

12:50

WELCOME

Startup Session: Shaping Tomorrow

A New Source of Energy

Artificial Intelligence Applications

Biomedicine

14:30

Lex Hoefsloot

Lex Hoefsloot, Solar Team Eindhoven

The Inevitable Marriage of Solar Energy and Transportation

The Inevitable Marriage of Solar Energy and Transportation

The talk will deal with future mobility in general and specifically solar powered cars. Solar cars have always been seen as unlikely combination and only feasible in the distant future. With the introduction of electric cars, light materials and better solar panels combined with some clever thinking, that future might arrive earlier than many people think. If we want to live in a world in which sustainable mobility is available for anyone at extremely low cost, solar cars are the way to go.

Lex Hoefsloot (24), Co-founder of Solar Team Eindhoven. Solar Team Eindhoven is a team of 20 students of the Eindhoven University of Technology. We built the world’s first solar powered family car. The car participated in and won the World Solar Challenge 2013 Cruiser class. Early this year, the car won a Crunchie (‘Oscar for technology’) in San Francisco.

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14:50

LUNCH

15:10

Jonathan Keeling

Jonathan Keeling, Pavegen

Pavegen - Energy From Your Footsteps!

The Future of Smart Cities

It is estimated that by 2050, 75% of the 9bn population will be living in cities. Meeting that energy demand in the urban environment requires a new solution within the energy mix. Wind and Solar are costly and inefficient in cities due to shadowing from high-rise buildings and limited roof space, as well as temperamental weather conditions. We at Pavegen have the solution - using an innovative, unique flooring technology to harness energy from footsteps.

Jonathan is Head of Business Development managing an international distributor network in over 10 countries worldwide as well as leading the Business Development Team at Pavegen. As a result of his tenacious business acumen and harnessing his MSc in Sustainable Development; Pavegen has worked and partnered with an extensive list of large blue chip clients including; WWF, Adidas, Centrica, Nike, Siemens, & Network Rail. As a confident and inspiring orator, Jonathan has attended numerous speaking events across the globe. Highlights include TEDxLondon ‘City 2.0’, GREAT Festival of Creativity in Istanbul as part of the GREAT Britain campaign.

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15:30

Marek Rosa

Marek Rosa, GoodAI

Three Pillars of Successful General AI Development

Three Pillars of Successful General AI Development

Why hasn’t general AI already been developed? Our answer: in order to successfully build general artificial intelligence, it is necessary to have the following: 1) Correct cognitive architecture; 2) Correct neural network modules within the architecture; and 3) The right training environment, which we call a “school” for AIs. It is necessary to test if certain abilities are present before the AI moves on to more complex stages. This school allows the AIs to engage in gradual learning – to build new knowledge on top of existing knowledge. This school for AI also involves ethics, as this is where AIs learn to value the things that humans value, to behave ethically, and to consider the safety of humans. The focus of the presentation will be primarily on point #3, and will cover GoodAI’s development process, approach, setbacks, and successes.

Marek is the CEO and founder of two Prague-based companies: Keen Software House, an independent video game development studio, and GoodAI, a general artificial intelligence R&D company. Keen Software House is best known for its sandbox best-sellers Space Engineers (1.5mil+ copies sold) and Medieval Engineers. Marek started the company as the sole programmer but later took on a leadership role when he transitioned to CEO. Marek has been fascinated with artificial intelligence since childhood. After the success of the Keen Software House titles, Marek was able to personally invest $10M USD in a new general AI research project trying to build human-level artificial intelligence. The project, now known as GoodAI, was announced as a company in July 2015 and has grown to a team of 30 people.

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David McClelland

David McClelland, Freelance

Compère

David is a freelance journalist and broadcaster across consumer and enterprise technology, cybersecurity and mobile. He has written for The Metro, International Business Times,TechRadar, CNET, Wired and Computer Weekly.

He is ITV Good Morning Britain’s regular technology expert, a cybercrime-buster for BBC Watchdog, consumer champion on BBC Rip Off Britain and co-host of Challenge TV mobile technology show Planet of the Apps.

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16:10

Vanessa Diaz

Vanessa Diaz, University College London

A Future of Medical Avatars: Personalised Medicine, Digital Healthcare & the Rise of the Digital Patient

A Future of Medical Avatars: Personalised Medicine, Digital Healthcare and the Rise of the Digital Patient

We are witnessing the dawn of a revolution in healthcare. Using computer models, we'll be able to create 'virtual twins' for each of us, that will be the most up-to-date version of ourselves in medical terms. These will become digital patients in hospitals; enabling doctors to tailor medical treatment and test drug efficacy virtually, before giving it to us & make predictions way into the future of potential outcomes - in a nutshell, manage our disease and provide truly personal healthcare. This talk will explore this possible future showing what is already happening today.

Vanessa Diaz is a Senior Lecturer in Bioengineering at University College London and is an expert in computational biomedicine, being one of the co-authors of the first book on the topic (“Computational Biomedicine”, Oxford University Press, 2014). Vanessa is mainly interested in the development and use of multi-scale computational tools and models in digital healthcare, especially in the cardiovascular field, which is the main focus of her scientific work. Vanessa has also been a champion of the development of a “Digital Patient”; a “virtual twin” concept, key in personalised medicine and she was the PI of the project “DISCIPULUS”, which was tasked by the European Commission with developing a roadmap towards the digital patient. Vanessa is also the lead of the “Multiscale Cardiovascular Engineering” group (MUSE; http://www.ucl.ac.uk/muse) in UCL.

16:30

Saquib Sarfraz

Saquib Sarfraz, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

Face Recognition can Now Work in Utter Darkness

Face Recognition can Now Work in Utter Darkness

This talk will present a new advancement made in enabling face recognition technology to work in darkness. The technology identifies a person from their thermal signature and matches with ordinary photos. Cross modal face or general image matching between the thermal and visible spectrum is a much desired capability for night-time surveillance and other civil/security applications. Due to a very large modality gap, thermal-to-visible face recognition is one of the most challenging matching problems.

In this talk, we will present new technology based on deep neural networks in bridging this modality gap by a significant margin. While showing its effectiveness on a much harder face recognition application, the new advancements made can be easily adapted and applied to general thermal-visible image matching, potentially opening doors to many new and exciting applications. We will discuss interesting directions that can enable this technology to work in real-time and with minimal computational resources making it very practical for various applications. We will also discuss some associated privacy and legal aspects concerning the use of this technology.

Saquib Sarfraz is currently working as a senior research scientist & lecturer with the computer vision for human interaction (CV-HCI) lab, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany. He is the team lead for the work in the direction of face recognition and also member of several related funded projects, where he is working on facial analysis & tracking for identity, age, and gender classification. He obtained his PhD in Computer Vision from Technical University Berlin, Germany in 2008. Before moving to KIT, he served as assistant professor (2009-2012) at the electrical engineering department of COMSATS Institute of Technology, Pakistan. There he founded and directed the Computer Vision Research Group (COMVis). His research interests include video surveillance, forensic image analysis, face recognition, multi modal biometrics, and general machine learning.

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Day 1
15:25

Andy Lewis

Andy Lewis,

WORKSHOP: 3D Scanning - Get yourself a mini-me. In Bishopsgate Room 1

3D Scanning - Get yourself a mini-me

3D Hubs was founded out of frustration that the industry was not delivering on the promise of 3D printing to decentralize manufacturing. In 2013 3D Hubs started its mission to connect all 3D printers globally into one online platform and make them locally accessible. By connecting everyone to nearby 3D Printer owners, 3D Hubs is accelerating a future of local and on-demand production. Today, 3D Hubs is already providing over one Billion people with access to 3D printing within 10 miles of their home.

Grass-roots maker, technologist and entrepreneur, Andy Lewis is what London’s crucible of creativity is all about. Starting in the early 1980’s as a programmer, Andy’s CV reads like a history book of technology. He’s worked on the first Acorn Atom single board computer, for large semiconductor companies, explaining the intricacies of silicon chips to engineers from Russia to Australia and the USA and assisted in the development of around 3,000 products from Digital Video Players to cellphone cameras and guitar amplifiers to automotive lighting systems. If he doesn’t have a good idea how it works, it’s probably magic!

In more recent years, Andy has turned his attention on the 3D space, first in 3D printing, and he still runs a London based 3DHub, printing "whatever people want" but more latterly to 3D scanning and online content. He experimented with the first-generation Microsoft Kinect and used it to build a rig for scanning up to 3 people at a time. He’s scanned dead fish for rock bands, conkers for fashion designers and his results consistently delight the clients of Pot8oSH3D ( Potato shed ), the 3D creative consultancy Andy founded in an old shed on a farm just North of London. Currently Andy is talent scouting for a 3Dweb "virtuality” project, when he’s not scanning, printing and ( rarely ) sleeping!

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Day 1
17:00

Wojtek Grabczak

Wojtek Grabczak,

WORKSHOP: 3D Scanning - Get yourself a mini-me. In Bishopsgate Room 1

3D Hubs is world’s largest and fastest growing network of 3D printers. By connecting everyone to nearby 3D Printer owners, 3D Hubs is accelerating a future of local and on-demand production. Our network consists of 20,000 printing locations worldwide, providing over one billion people access to a 3D printer within 10 miles of their home.

Curious about 3D scanning? Want to find out what it's all about? We'd like to invite you to the 3D Hubs Scanner Party at #reworktech!

This is your opportunity to get yourself a 3D printed Mini-Me or get grandma’s tableware scanned and restored to its original glory. During the event you be able to scan objects, or get yourself a 3D selfie scan. We’ll give you a quick overview of how 3D scanning works and provide a voucher for you to print your scan in all its glory at a later date. Spaces are limited so RSVP to pcurtis@re-work.co to secure your spot.

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Day 1
14:00

Charlotte Scott

Charlotte Scott,

Virtual Reality - the Future of TV? In Partnership with FutureFest - In Bishopsgate Room 2

An innovative and digital savvy music consultant with front-line international release experience in a major label, booking agency and artist management. A highly organised individual who enjoys strategic planning of a campaign from inception to close, whilst having the ability to communicate to a team with clarity and authority. Combining foresight into new trends and an ability to build strong commercial relationships with forward thinking brands to deliver successful campaign strategies.

Charlottes passion and interest for all things music and interactive has lead to setting up 13 Mile Music, a music management and consultant company.

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Day 2
13:45

Zillah Watson

Zillah Watson,

360 Video & Virtual Reality: the Future of News? In Partnership with FutureFest - Bishopsgate Room 2

360 Video & Virtual Reality: the Future of News?

Virtual reality could one day transform the way news is reported by allowing people to experience events as if they were there themselves. And it’s happening now – with 360 films recently released showing conditions in war torn Syria and the Calais migrant camp. But what are the technical and editorial challenges and what social and ethical issues might VR raise? We’ll look at recent examples, including 360 degree experimental films produced by BBC R&D/BBC New Labs to explore the possibilities of immersive news and current affairs.

Zillah Watson, a former current affairs producer, leads future content and storytelling projects for the BBC Research and Development. Current projects include developing VR and immersive journalism for news/current affairs; curation of web content; and developing web-native ways to navigate dramas and soaps. She recently produced and curated Alistair Cooke’s Letter from America archive for BBC Radio 4, which was nominated for a Sony Award. She was head of editorial standards for Radio 4 for five years.

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